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November 19th, 2012

Seriously, Chris? Seriously?

I mean, seriously, Chris? You're still letting that make you crazy?

You're about to hit the first anniversary of getting fired from a job that was making you crazy, and you still think back to how the job made you crazy? You still get worked up over the weird circumstances and constrictions of that job?

Think of it this way, Chris: you were getting paid (not all that well, honestly, but anyway) to deal with that job in that situation. Now that you're not getting paid to deal with that, you're going to get even less out of obsessing over that situation. You're letting that (former! Former!) situation still affect you. That's dumb.

Yes, do your best to keep from getting into another work situation like that; yes, keep the lessons of that job in mind as you look for work; but knowing you were in an unfair situation in that job and had trouble trying to make it more fair should not mean that the unfairness of that job should still affect you. Shooting yourself in the foot is NEVER a good idea. Moving on with lessons learned is.

I mean, seriously?

(And no, you're not going to get a job with the Leverage team, because they don't exist.)

"There are other jobs, better jobs. You're bound to be qualified for at least one of them." -- Randal Graves, Clerks (1994)

Tags:

Less wordy!

Editing continues apace. I'm into Chapter 5 (it's a short-chaptered work, but still) of re-reading/ revising "The Idiot Plot," and what's satisfying so far? Realizing I didn't need lots of those words.

National Novel Writing Month heavily emphasizes word count, to measure your progress: hitting the NaNoWriMo goal of 50,000 words in a month averages out to 1,667 words a day, which is damn doable. But back in 2002 some of those words included

Carol pulled the envelope back up off the table and held it to her abdomen, as a churning uncertainty hit her. Her arm waved the envelope – alternately farther from and closer to her body, closer to and farther from the table. It looked like invisible tug-of-war between her and the wood upon which she had intended to place the note. She then dropped the envelope, and let it land on the tabletop.

Which is now, for the moment at least,

Carol pulled the envelope back up off the table and held it to her abdomen, as a churning uncertainty hit her. Her arm waved the envelope. She then dropped it, and let it land on the tabletop.

There. Thirty-seven words instead of 73. Extreme example (plenty of times I'm just taking out, for example, "the"). I think 2002-Me wanted to play up how she vacillated, but the first line does that. "It looked like invisible tug-of-war between her and the wood upon which she had intended to place the note" is a bad line, but one that probably sounded poetic to me 10 years ago. Now-Me sees that it doesn't really say anything. Or at least it doesn't say enough. So it's gone. (To reference Stephen King again, in On Writing he wrote an excerpt of what became his short story "1408," then edited it, and added notes taking the piss out of his initial writing choices. "The first-draft copy reads 'Mike sat down in one of the chairs in front of the desk.' Well, duh -- where else is he going to sit? On the floor? I don't think so, and out it goes.")

Shorter: I LIKE EDITING. I should do it more.

I know, this isn't ground-breaking for all y'all who DO THIS FOR A LIVING, but I like being reminded.

Tags:

Thank you, Gizmodo, for digging up 23 ancient web sites that are still alive. Includes CNN's link page for O.J. Simpson trial coverage, an incredibly early blog site (before LJ and even before anyone had coined "blog"), and the Space Jam site.

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