Chris Walsh (chris_walsh) wrote,
Chris Walsh
chris_walsh

Bleepin' great language

An idea I had? Turned out someone other than me thought it was a good idea.

Monday's "8@8" song set on 94.7's Alternative Mornings had songs with words bleeped or scrambled for radio play:
Lou Reed, "Take a Walk on the Wild Side"
Radiohead, "Creep" (the radio edit)
Pearl Jam, "Jeremy"
Cake, "I Will Survive"
Green Day, "Boulevard of Broken Dreams"
Ben Folds Five, "Song for the Dumped"
Nirvana, "Verse Chorus Verse"
Red Hot Chili Peppers, "Suck My Kiss"
Thanks, Mr. Glover!

Evidence in this journal to the contrary, I actually like profanity. I have reasons for not using it much -- mainly, I don't think it use it well -- but it's an interesting tool. I've had skewed ideas about it, though. When I was in high school near D.C., I was a Top-40 listener (WAVA when it still had Don & Mike and before it became a Christian talk station) and never listened to prog-rock/alt-rock station WHFS (before or after it became a Latin tropical station). I remember someone telling me about WHFS band The Dead Milkmen, whose lyrics and at least one song title have profanity in them, and I thought Why? 'Cause then you can't play them on the radio! Silly me. It just takes radio-edits. (I wasn't too radio- or tech-savvy yet. That and word-scrambling techniques weren't as good as digital editing allows now.)

Eventually I became a student of profanity. Not enough to use it much still (though blubeagle, aoniedesade, rafaela and slipjig don't mind if I potty-mouth it up on the phone), but enough to think about it. Sometimes it's a language tool, sometimes it's a language seasoning. And sometimes it's the language equivalent of carpet bombing. Yes, profanity can be used by good and evil. And even amusement. (I wouldn't be a Kevin Smith fan if I didn't think so!)
Tags: language, music, radio
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